What It Means To Be Healthy

“It’s called the South Beach Fat Flush, and all you drink is cranberry juice for 72 hours.” – Regina George from Mean Girls

This is the world we live in. People going on fad diets, cleanses, detoxes, and fasts to look a certain way. This is what people think it means to be healthy.

As I have mentioned before, being healthy is not a one-size-fits-all approach. What I do on a daily basis may not work for you, and vice versa. However, there are healthy living practices that we can use as a guide to help inspire us to live a better life.

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  • Be active most days of the week

This is kind of vague, but it goes back to my point of every body being different, and we all have different goals. A person beginning their fitness journey may not run as far as the person training for their first half marathon. The body builder working toward a competition likely works out hours a day while the person wanting to tone works out for an hour…all of that is irrelevant. Do what works for you and your goals. The most important thing is that you are active.

  • Eat your veggies

…or all plants for that matter. Plants are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and water, making them BEST for your body. Strive to get the majority of your diet from plants, making half of your plate non-starchy veggies at meals. Not only will it be kind to your waistline, but the fiber will help you feel full for longer periods of time AND will help keep your digestion regular.

  • Stay hydrated

This is so vital. Our bodies are 55-60% water, so it is important that we replace what is lost. Water can be lost in the obvious ways–urine, sweat, and bowel movements…but we also lose water when we breathe and stress! When we are dehydrated, our body’s cortisol (the stress hormone) levels increase–making it another good idea to drink water consistently throughout the day to decrease stress levels.

  • Limit added sugars

Women should truly be consuming 25 grams or less of added sugars daily, while the recommendation for men is 36 grams per day. On average, one 12 ounce can of soda contains 39 grams of added sugar–that is over a days worth! Added sugar can also wreck your immune system, making it easier for you to get sick. While I am not saying you can never splurge and have sugar, be mindful of where your added sugars are coming from and limit them most of the time.

  • Engage in healthy relationships

We were made to communicate with each other–as much of an introvert I am…I realize how important it is to be part of a community. Spend time with your family and friends–go out of your way to be kind to others. Socialize with people you’ve just met. Get to know someone new. You will be more fulfilled, create new relationships, and grow as a person.

  • Grow spiritually

Regardless of your religious preferences, take time for your spiritual life daily. It can be so easy getting caught up in the chaos of every day, but make time for your devotions. As a Christian, I talk to God throughout the day, multiple times a day. Writing in my prayer journal is another way I feel connected with Him, and it is neat to look back on past entries to see what He has done to help me overcome past issues.

 

What other guides do you use to stay healthy?  Remember, healthy living is individualized to your own personal needs. If you’d like help meeting those needs and want to jump on the healthy lifestyle bandwagon, send me a message!

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!

Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

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Instagram: @betterwithkatdetter_rd

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Ditch the Resolutions

Okay, I know what you’re thinking…so hear me out…

It’s a new year, you wanna make a new you! You write down your New Year’s resolutions in an old notebook you have lying around your house and suddenly, you’re super motivated for the upcoming year.

“I’m gonna work out every day.  I’m going to eat healthy. I’m going to stop eating sugar. I’m going to save money. I’m going to socialize more…”

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I get it. I’ve been there. And I’ve been there mid February when all those resolutions go down the toilet…

So many of us get super pumped and motivated initially, but then get kind of overwhelmed after changing so much at one time that we quit doing all of the resolutions altogether.

Take it from a dance/group fitness instructor…classes are hoppin’ in January…then they slow down in February…and it seems like nobody comes back until it’s bathing suit season. We all do it! We all make these “plans” for the new year and then forget about them when things get tough…

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Here’s a little tough love for ya…don’t make resolutions! Making so many resolutions set us up for failure because we need to be realistic with changes to be made.

Here is a scenario. You are sedentary but decide for your New Year’s resolution you will workout at 5:30am before you go to work everyday. That is quite an ambitious goal! A few things may happen: 1) you go too hard in the gym, hurt yourself, and decide the gym isn’t for you and 2) you are so tired from your early workout that you have brain fog at work. Making frequent, small changes is often a better solution because you can build on the improvement you made once you accomplish it.

For instance, instead of going hard at the gym 5 days in a row after being sedentary for the past year, build your tolerance up. I would never recommend a sedentary individual to go run 5 miles on their first day. Work your way up to the fitness level you want to be.

Instead of making a bunch of resolutions for 2019, I challenge you to start right now! Make a specific goal for yourself and write it down somewhere you can see it daily. Below is a format you can use to truly see your change.

Use the S.M.A.R.T. Guide: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Timeline.

Specific: What is it that you want to achieve from this “resolution” or better yet, change? Example: I want to exercise more.

Measurable: How much of this change do you want to see? Example: I want to exercise 3 days a week.

Attainable: How can you make this change happen? What do you need to do to make this change happen? Example: I need to meet with a personal trainer to help me get in the groove of working out 3 days per week.

Realistic: Is this goal achievable? Can you dedicate 3 days per week to going to the gym? Is this plan realistic for you. If it is not, look back and see what variation of the plan may be realistic for you.

Timeline: When do you want to achieve your goal? Example: I want to exercise 3 days a week within the next month.

 

I had a college professor tell me that is takes 21 days to start a habit…so don’t give up on it too soon! Your goal can become a habit if you stick with it long enough.

 

Tips for goal setting:

  1. Write your goal down in a journal specifically for your goals. Journal about your journey with that particular goal, and when the goal is met, use that same journal to log the rest of your goals.
  2. Be positive! Ain’t nobody got time for negativity. I think it is healthy to acknowledge our failures, but do it in a positive light. “I only made it to the gym twice this week, but I will do better next week.”
  3. Track your progress using a calendar, day planner, or dry-erase board so you won’t only be the change but you’ll also see the change.
  4. Plan an achievement-reward. This will give you incentive to keep working toward your goal! It could be a shopping spree, nice dinner date with your significant other, a vacation, or even just a day devoted just to you!

 

Ultimately, we should be setting goals as they arise instead of making a bunch of “resolutions” at once that are unrealistic and most of the time fail. Instead of setting ourselves up for failure, let’s set goals using the S.M.A.R.T. technique.

Challenge for the week: Grab a journal and write down one S.M.A.R.T. goal to implement before the new year…that way your new “habit” will already be in place!

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

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Facebook: Live Better with Kat Detter

Instagram: @betterwithkatdetter_rd

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My Tri-Experience

Heart racing. Legs shaking. Muscles pumping. Sweat beading.

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Those are all attributes of a race, my friends. I have completed numerous 5k’s, 8k’s and 2 half marathons…the next race on my list was a triathlon. I wanted to do one for years, but I just recently got a road bike and was able to fulfill my dream.

Initially, I had no idea where to start! I read countless blogs on tri-tips and training programs. I looked on Pinterest for a clear cut training plan, and finally I created one that worked well for me.

I chose to do a sprint triathlon for my first one consisting of a 400 yard swim, 16 mile bike ride, and 3.1 mile run. I remember thinking, “Oh, I got this! The only thing I really need to train is the biking”…boy was I wrong!

After my first bike ride of a lonely 5 miles, I realized that biking is a lot harder than I thought it would be—but it was also really fun! I made my way up to 10 miles before I realized I needed to practice the bike-run transition. I trained for about 1 ½ months before the triathlon.

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On race day, my husband drove my cousin and me to the race site. We were extremely surprised when we arrived and saw tons of people with fancy triathlon bikes, tri suits, and sporting gear…and there we were…in our quick dry shorts and sports bras. I was intimidated.

Leading up to the race, I gazed over the different transition sites, as this was my biggest concern. After that, I got in the lake and started swimming to warm up. To my surprise, the water was very warm! That made it easier.

Fast forward 30 minutes, and it was time for takeoff. All the ladies 40 and under got in the lake ready for the gun shot to begin. That feeling was like nothing I’ve ever felt before…anxious, excited, and terrified all at the same time! What if I kick someone? Or worse, what if someone kicks me and knocks my teeth out!? I would not be able to complete the triathlon.

Once I began swimming, I felt confident that we would all stay safe-ish and complete…except the swim was way more difficult than I thought! I have always been a strong swimmer, but I started out too fast and before I made it to the first buoy, my heart was beating out of my chest. I had to tell myself to slow down. Swimming in a lake is completely different than a pool…for one, the water is green not clear…so you really are not sure what is around you. Second, there are multiple bodies passing you and though no one got hit, I was still very alert. Lastly, they had us swimming against the current…I definitely didn’t practice that!

Getting out of the lake and onto land was sketchy, as my legs felt like complete jello! I thought “How in the world am I gonna make it?” alas, I did…I made it to the bike, threw my shoes on and hit the road. I got this…

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I don’t got this! Though I trained on hills, this course kicked my tail! There were minimal downhill areas and a lot of gradual inclines. I was disappointed when I made it to the 5 mile mark thinking it felt like 10 miles already…

I somehow managed to finish the 16 miles and begin my run. Honestly, the run was the best part! Before my race, I was sure the run would be the hardest part! It was actually my favorite, and I ran it faster than I did when I was training. Crossing that finish line was such a great feeling!

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Whether we finished first or last, we finished! I know, we compare ourselves to one another…everyone wants to be the best—that is in our human nature. However, there are so many different people in the world…people with short legs, long legs, thick thighs, thin thighs, broad shoulders, narrow shoulders…the list could go on.

In Galatians 6: 4-6, the Bible reads “Don’t compare yourself with others. Just look at your own work to see if you have done anything to be proud of. You must each accept the responsibilities that are yours.”

You see, God made us the way He wants us…that does not mean that we are all perfect the way we are, no. He inspires us to challenge ourselves in life to make us not only stronger human beings, but to be stronger in Jesus. These types of experiences help us grow spiritually.

This was one of my challenging goals—seeing that I can put my mind to something and achieve it. Without God’s help, I truly would not have had the strength or the determination through my training or my triathlon.

Be happy with where you stand regardless if you come in 2nd place or finish last. You completed something you set your mind to, and the only person you are competing with is yourself.

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What is something you have set your mind to and completed? I would love to hear!

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

 

 

Girl, Stop Body Shaming Yourself

Have you ever struggled with body image?

This blog is going to get a little personal. Body image issues are especially troublesome in the diet-driven world we live in today.

This is especially tough for me, as I have struggled with body image my whole life. Today, I am going to share my journey with you in hopes of inspiring someone with the same insecurities as me that it is okay – you can whole heartidly achieve health promoting behaviors at any size and respect your body for what it does for you.

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When I was a teenager, I was discriminated for my body size. Girls made fun of me because I was “bigger” than them. It lead me to chase a smaller body by restricting foods, skipping meals, over-exercising, and comparing myself to others. This highly affected my relationship with food, body and self.

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Just a background on me. I absolutely love exercising–I love anything from swimming, running, dancing to weight lifting and body weight exercises.I have completed 2 half marathons, a sprint triathlon, numerous 5K’s and 8K’s.

During my teenage years, I felt poorly about myself. It was not until I began attending Zumba Fitness classes that I began moving my body regularly–and regularly at that time was 2-3 times per week. I was always trying the new “wellness diet”-convinced that was the only way I could love myself – if I lost weight. Despite all of that, I still lacked confidence. Once I started doing Zumba, I felt better about myself, and I was a lot happier. Zumba was my gateway to fitness, and when I turned 16, I started instructing my own dance fitness classes.

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By the time I moved to Collegedale, TN to begin my first year at Southern Adventist University, I was regularly exercising doing more than Zumba. I was attending spin classes, Pilates, and running. I tried to keep my fitness regimen up even though I was not instructing anymore. In my second year at SAU, I taught a cardio class and strength class to continue my love for showing people that exercise can be fun. I had a great following, and it inspired me as an instructor to come up with new material.

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So it seems like I had it made, right? I was teaching fitness classes, enjoying time with friends, passing all my classes–but I still struggled with my body. However, it was not because I was upset with my body…it was because of the negativity I received from my shape. One day, this girl asked if she could borrow some of my clothing for a date she was going on. I was flattered–she must like my sense of style. She comes to my dorm room and goes through some clothes. We found a top she likes, but it went best with colored pants. She did not own any colored pants–but I did! She proceeded to ask me what size I wear, and I told her…”I am a size 4″.

In the most horrified, shocked, confused tone of voice she responds You’re a size 4!?”  It was a complete shock to her. I then said “Well, I have size 6 too?”  She kind of apologized and said “Well, I mean, I just thought you were bigger than that. I can’t believe you wear a size 4!”

Fast forward two years…I was a 21-year-old Nutrition & Dietetics student whose ultimate goal was to help others achieve their dreams of becoming healthier individuals. I want to inspire others to live better, and now, I truly believe that is accomplished through gentle nutrition, joyful movement and active spirituality.

Despite my dream, I had a lot of discouragement, especially when I started my nutrition program. It was a constant battle between “oh no, I am going to fail this course, and if I do I am going to get kicked out of the program”. However, after my exercise physiology class, I was in a different state. I was in the state of “oh no, my anthropometrics numbers are not within normal limits. My body fat percentage is too high. I am fat.”

How can this be? I had such an amazing fitness and wellness journey and am comfortable with the size I am. How could I feel so crummy about myself? So what if I am 156 pounds and have a body fat percentage that is “high”? Why can such stupid numbers affect me so much? Why do I get so down on myself when people are praising others because they are so fit? I should be happy for them, but it is so hard to be when you are sitting in the corner thinking about how much time and dedication you put into your workouts and lifestyle and no one notices. There I was, 2 years later…still getting discriminated for my body size.

Despite these repressions of my body dysmorphia struggles, I tried so hard to find a silver lining. Then I realized something–the only true way for me to get a silver lining is through spirituality. Remember when I said the three ways to truly live a better life were gentle nutrition, joyful movement, and active spirituality? I was missing a key dimension in the plan. Yes, I am an active Christian, but I was not looking to God for my body image issue. I was looking at other people and comparing myself. I was putting myself down and hurting me–that is it. I was hurting me not anybody else.

“For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.”

-Ephesians 2:10

Ephesians 2:10 says “For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” You see, we are God’s “handiwork”–he created each and every one of us. He loves us just the way we are. Now, I do believe in 1 Corinthians 6:19 he says “Do you not know that your bodies are the temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?” By Him saying this, he wants us to take care of ourselves. Remember the way to take care of yourselves? Gentle nutrition, joyful movement, and spirituality. That is the way.

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So there you have it. I have been judged for the way I look. But you know what? It really does not matter what others think. I am doing what I can to keep my body healthy and most of all…happy. You can be healthy at any size, hunnies! It does not matter what size you are, the color of your hair, or how fast you can run a mile–it is about how you see yourself. Stop comparing yourself to others; just focus on making YOURself the best YOU that you can be.

Love yourself–respect your body. Love what God has given you. He created you the way He wants you with the ability and strength to achieve whatever you want, be it a half marathon runner or dance instructor. If we were all the same, life would be boring. When you can fully love who you are as a person then you can love others they way Christ intended. There are so many other barriers we have blocking us from truly loving ourselves–this is just one of mine. You can look to Christ for any of these barriers, and I encourage you to do that.

You are beautifully & wonderfully made.

Jumpstart your mindful eating journey by downloading my 6 Steps to Mindful Eating guide here – it’s free!

Until Next Time,
Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Follow me on social media!

What Kind of Tree are You?

I had a professor, one very near and dear to my heart, ask us this question in class last quarter.  “If you were a tree, what kind would you be and why?”

That is an interesting question, and one that I have never thought about.   I would like to think of myself as some really extraordinary, cool tree.  Something like a glorious, majestic cedar tree that smells like winter, or even an evergreen—Christmas trees make families happy and in the spirit of giving—but the truth is, I am neither of those; nor am I any other spectacular tree constantly bringing joy to others.  I think I relate to a persimmon tree.

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You may be thinking, huh, a persimmon tree.  I know—odd tree to choose.  However, when I think about it, a persimmon tree is very much my “spirit tree”.  The tree grows up to produce fruit.  This fruit that it produces has a prime season when it is ripe and delicious (if you like persimmons).  However, when the fruit is not ripe, it leaves a very astringent aftertaste.

Just like the persimmon tree, I have grown up to “blossom” into my intelligence, wisdom (kind of), and experience.  I have produced fruit—both good and bad.  My fruit is my characteristics.  I have good ones, but I have some bad ones too.  Just like the unripe persimmon, I can be very bitter and negative, making others think I am “astringent”.  On the other hand, and hopefully more times than none, I would like to think I produce the good fruit—the ripe fruit—the fruit that is sweet, sensitive, and refreshing—a positive fruit.

I think we all have times that we are proud of and times that we are not.  I will strive my hardest to produce more “good fruit” than bad that way my tree will survive and be successful.

Matthew 7:16 says, “You will recognize them by their fruits.  Are grapes gathered from thorn bushes  or figs from thistles?”  

So, think about it.  What kind of tree are you?  What are some things you could change to better yourself?  How can you inspire others and yourself to be the “good” fruit?

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Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

 

Resources:
Bible NLT, Translation TNL, Translation NL.  The Holy Bible: New Living Translation. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers; July 1, 1997.