5 Tips to Gain Body Confidence

What’s your experience with poor body image?

My poor body image started when I was a pre-teen–about 10 years old. I wasn’t tiny like the other girls my age…I didn’t have many friends, I was insecure, I lacked confidence and self worth. That mindset followed me throughout middle and most of high school until I decided I was worth more. I deserved more. Now, it still took me years to be at peace with my body (and I still struggle with it today!), BUT these 5 tips have helped me keep those negative thoughts away…and it can help you, too!

Body Confidence

1. Wear clothes that make you feel good
Dress to impress–yourself! Ain’t nobody got time to wear clothes that don’t make them FEEL good. If that means going a size up, do it! The size of your clothes does not define you as a person or your health.

When I was in high school and college, I’d only wear things that were a certain size. If they didn’t fit me, I would put them back on the rack and forget they existed. No sizing up for me!

Last week I went shopping and found THE cutest rompers–and guess what? The small was too small for me! Instead of dreaming about how cute it “would have” been, I decided to try the medium-and I’m so glad I did because it looks good, and I feel super confident in it. Don’t let the size of something define you. Wear clothes that embrace your confidence!

2. Move your body
Why do you move your body? Exercise releases endorphins, the happy hormone, and those endorphins can help you have a clear, happy mind. What’s more? They can bring you confidence.

Think of the different kinds of workouts you’ve done. Which ones make your body feel amazing?? Which ones make you feel defeated? Choose to do the activity that makes you feel good.

As for me, swimming makes my body feel amazing from my head to my toes. I can feel all my muscles. Our bodies are all different and we all like different things, so find what jives with you.

3. Celebrate your body
“My legs are too short.”
“My butt is too big.”
“My thighs are huge.”
“My stomach isn’t flat.”

I was concerned with every one of those things when I was a pre-teen–overly consumed with ‘how’ my body looked…constantly comparing myself to my teenie-bopper classmates. But you know what I was doing wrong? I was shaming my body for what it wasn’t instead of celebrating it for what it was! When you can change the mindset of “these are my imperfections” to “these are my strengths”, you can love and appreciate your body more.

My legs may be short, but I have them-and they get me from point A to point B. I am able to challenge myself in my workouts daily. My booty and thighs may be “bigger”, but they are strong. Any time a negative thought comes into your mind, just think of how far you’ve come and tell yourself, “Nope, we aren’t gonna talk like that. We are gonna celebrate our body instead”.

4. Stop comparing yourself to others
It’s super common to envy what others have–we all have our insecurities…me included! If you find yourself comparing yourself to someone on social media, unfollow them. If you compare yourself to someone else in the gym, go workout in a different spot. Bottom line: try your best to eliminate the source of negativity. Stop comparing yourself to others and start celebrating YOU. You do you, boo!

5. Daily Affirmations
Affirmations can help you change your mindset about your body and self worth. I encourage you to engage in daily affirmations. Look at yourself in the mirror and say:

“My body deserves love and respect”
“Food is not the enemy, I’m grateful food nourishes me”
“Thank you, body, for getting me through that tough workout”
“My worth is not defined by my weight”
“I am comfortable in my own skin”
“Other people’s opinion on my body do not involve my thoughts”
“I take care of my body by doing ______”
“My body is a vessel for my awesomeness”
“I feel sexy today!”

It doesn’t matter what you tell yourself–whether you tell it to yourself in the mirror or write in down in a journal–positive self talk is foundational in changing your mindset toward your body and self.

I challenge you to focus on one of these tips this week. Track your progress, make goals for yourself. You deserve to be unconditionally happy with food, your body, and yourself.

Jumpstart your mindful eating journey by downloading my 6 Steps to Mindful Eating guide here – it’s free!

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @mindful.eating.dietitian
FB: Live Better with Kat Detter
Twitter: @katrinadetterRD

4 Steps to Learn Your Hunger Cues

One of the 10 Principles of Intuitive eating is using your hunger and fullness cues, but what does that actually mean? How do you do that?

After years of fad dieting, I kind of lost touch with my physiological signs of hunger. I ate when society said it was “time to eat”. If I was hungry at 11:00am, I’d avoid it like the plague until the clock striked 12:00pm. I used to treat hunger as a “bad thing”–because I associated eating as a “bad thing”. Now that I have a healthier relationship with food and myself, I am able to eat when I am hungry and stop when I am satisfied, and you can too! Use my 4 Steps to Learn Your Hunger & Fullness Cues!

Hunger & Fullness Cues
Learn you Hunger & Fullness Cues

Use a hunger/fullness scale before, during & after meals
When you are first learning your hunger/fullness levels, it is important to use some sort of scale to keep your hunger in check. On a scale from 1-10, how hungry are you? how full are you? are you satisfied? Ask yourself these questions before, during and after a meal or snack to help you gauge your true hunger. The goal is to be completely satisfied with your meal–not hungry or overly full. This is not only to keep you physiologically full  until the next meal, but also to help you keep your mind off of food.

Hunger & Fullness Scale
Hunger & Fullness Scale

Journal before and after your meals
As cheesy as it sounds, this can be your most helpful tool in re-learning your hunger & fullness cues. When you use the hunger & fullness scale, write about it! Before your meal, document what level of hunger you’re experiencing. After your meal, note what level of  fullness you’re experiencing. If you are not satisfied, figure out what you can add to your meal to appease your hunger. If you are miserably full, write down how you can prevent that from happening in the future.

Hunger & Fullness Cues
Journal before & after meals while learning hunger & fullness cues

Avoid starvation: use practical hunger
Practical hunger is essentially eating something when you’re not physically hungry to prevent overidulgence later. For example, if you are not very hungry at 12:30pm but you know you won’t get to eat again until 6:00pm, use practical hunger to tide you over. When using practical hunger, choose foods that will nourish your body with at least 2 of the 3 macronutrients. This will keep you full for a longer period of time.

Slow down at meals
Take time to really enjoy your food. It will not only make your meal more enjoyable but also allow your hunger to catch up with your brain. When you take your time at meals, it allows you to feel hunger satisfaction before you reach the “over full” stage, preventing overindulgence.

A note on overeating:
It happens. Try not to beat yourself up about it. Our bodies can handle some overeating here and there–we learn from it and move on. It takes time in the beginning when you’re learning how to correctly use your hunger/fullness cues. Give yourself grace and learn from your experience. Eventually, you will know your body so well that overeating will happen less.

 

I challenge you to learn your hunger & fullness cues. Take it one step at a time, and you’ll eventually become fully in tune with your body’s hunger.

 

Remember! If you’d like to receive my email newsletters for more easy + balanced eating ideas & food freedom tips, subscribe here! Tell your friends 🙂

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @balanced.nutrition.dietitian
FB: Live Better with Kat Detter
Twitter: @katrinadetterRD

 

What is Intuitive Eating?

Have you ever struggled with food freedom? Felt guilty at just the thought of eating a certain food or food group? Been on every diet in the book?

I sure have. I have shared my obsessions with food and over-exercising several times before…and today, I want to share with you the freedom I have found with intuitive eating.

Intuitive eating is such a big topic that I am going cover a few blog posts on. Today, I am going to break down what intuitive eating is and what it is not. It is my hope that if you struggle with food rules, deprivation, restriction, purging, or maintaining a healthy relationship with food that this may become one of your wellness goals: to become an intuitive eater.

Green Field Girl Spring Pinterest Graphic

What is Intuitive Eating?
When you think “intuitive” think “instinctive”. What are our actual physical instincts when it comes to hunger? Logically, when we are hungry, we *should* eat. Many restrictive diets cause us to completely neglect our true hunger cues and just eat a portioned amount of food based on society’s limitations.

Intuitive eating is also based on these 10 principles:
1. Rejecting the diet mentality
2. Honoring your hunger
3. Making peace with food
4. Challenging the food police
5. Discovering the satisfaction factor
6. Feel your fullness
7. Cope with your body’s emotions with kindness
8. Respecting your body
9. Exercising to feel a difference
10. Honoring your health

The Break-Down of The 10 Principles of Intuitive Eating:

  1. Rejecting the diet mentality:
    Transitioning the common societal view eating “healthy”. Especially this time of the year, many people go around saying “I am going to get back on track” or “my diet starts tomorrow”. When you become and intuitive eater, you honor your hunger and body by fueling it properly using gentle nutrition, but also know there is a time and a place for cookies…because let’s be real, a life without FUN foods is not as enjoyable.
  2. Honoring your hunger:
    Have you ever been on a “diet” that gave specific times to eat food? Certain portion sizes? Only allowed you to eat certain foods? That’s a major problem with diet culture–not teaching you to really listen, know or honor your hunger cues. With intuitive eating, you base eating needs on your physiological hunger.What are the physiological signs of hunger??
    Physiological hunger is your body’s way of saying “hey, feed me!”

    Signs of hunger:
    *empty stomach
    *stomach growling
    *dizzy/light-headedness
    *headache
    *irritability (HELLO hangry monster!)
    *difficulty concentrating
  3. Making peace with food:
    Any of you ever experienced fear foods? Foods you fear are going to make you gain weight? Foods that society has deemed “bad”?I used to have a huge fear of peanut butter and would only eat the powedered peanut butter because it was low in fat and calories. However, when I started studying nutrition in college, I learned that while peanut butter may be higher in fat and calories, it is also a great plant based protein source. The fat in peanut butter is actually beneficial for your hormone production and heart health. There is much nutrition in peanut butter, and I am happy to say now I am at peace with it and probably eat it daily.You can make peace with any food. When you can break it down and realize your body needs fuel for survival. Truly think of food as fuel. Know that your body can handle eating a cookie on Christmas…a slice of cake on your birthday…a piece of chocolate on Valentine’s day. The bottom line is: with intuitive eating, you never feel deprived or restricted of any food…so when you allow yourself to have more indulgent foods, you don’t feel the need to eat as much as your body can hold.
  4. Challenging the food police:
    Do you know how many times people have analyzed what I eat? Especially now that I am a registered dietitian. I remember my grandpa telling me I shouldn’t eat macaroni and cheese because it would “make me fat”. Or having family members say “Oh, you’re eating cake??” at Thanksgiving dinner. Those comments are annoying, and very difficult for those transiting into the food freedom lifestyle. As hard as it may be, my biggest advice is taking those comments with a grain of salt, and always think about what you’re gonna say next. You can always say “I’m at peace with  food, and very thankful that I can enjoy this pumpkin cheesecake today”. 🙂
  5. Discovering the satisfaction factor:
    Lots of times when we “diet”, we may not be satisfied with what we are being “forced” to eat. “Oh, I’m trying to eat healthy…guess that means I have to eat salad every day.”

    When we are in that mindset of “I have to eat this because it is healthy”, then our bodies aren’t satisfied. We aren’t eating foods we actually enjoy…meaning we aren’t satisfied after a meal. With intuitive eating, you choose foods based on your preference and what you want to eat. You may choose a big mixed greens salad for lunch with some lean protein, avocado, and vinegar based dressing. Other times, you may choose to have a burger with roasted vegetables. Regardless, you learn how to be satisfied after a meal so in turn, you won’t binge and mindlessly eat later on.
  6. Feel your fullness:
    Just as we should honor our hunger cues, we also need to honor our fullness cues, or our satiety level. As an intuitive eater, you learn how to stop eating when you are  full. No one is perfect! Overeating happens to all of us, but intuitive eating can help us learn when to stop at our fullness level, which helps us not overindulge.
  7. Cope with your emotions with kindness:
    This essentially means not to “fix” your emotions with food. Find other kind ways to handle your emotions. Find something that destresses you…that brings you comfort. It could be painting a mural, talking to a friend, journaling…whatever it may be, focus on that instead of food.
  8. Respecting your body:
    This can be easier said than done. From a spiritual aspect, God created you the way He wanted you to be. He wants you to be healthy and develop healthy relationships with people and health. Your body is a celebration of His creation, and wasting time worrying about your size does not enhance your life. Respect your body and what it can do. You are more than the number on the scale or the size in your pants. Focus on your strength. Your talents. Your growth. Your relationships. Your happiness. Respect yourself.
  9. Movement-feel the difference:
    This is all about shifting the mindset of “how many calories can I burn during this session” to “what movement brings me joy?” Don’t run if you hate running. Don’t spin if you hate biking. Find what exercise brings you joy and you’ll never feel “forced” to workout ever again…you’ll even look forward to your workout sessions!
  10. Honor your health using gentle nutrition:
    This is my favorite one! There are so many misconceptions with intuitive eating, but intuitive eaters know how to eat well by using gentle nutrition. With gentle nutrition, you honor your food choices and taste buds with foods you enjoy. Bye, bye kale salads, hello burrito bowls! You don’t instantly become “unhealthy” from one snack, meal, or one day of eating. Intuitive eaters focus on eating well consistently over time versus eating perfectly 24/7. It’s all about progress over perfection with gentle nutrition.

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What Intuitive Eating Isn’t:
Intuitive eating isn’t anti-health. It isn’t eating cookies all day long. It isn’t failing to eat nourishing foods. It isn’t mindlessly eating. It isn’t neglecting physical activity. It isn’t eating highly processed foods “just ‘cuz.”

Intuitive Eating is used to help people truly learn to fuel their bodies without a fear of food, without restricting, without guilt, without over-exercising. Intuitive Eating helps us learn to be comfortable choosing a big salad for lunch, but also realizing if you eat a cookie for dessert that you aren’t “unhealthy”. 

Intuitive Eating
What intuitive eating is and what it isn’t

I hope you now have a better idea of what this intuitive eating movement is all about, and it is my hope that we all can make peace with food. Life is too short to be a chronic dieter.

Make sure you subscribe to my blog so you get all my newest material sent straight to your inbox.

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Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @mindful.eating.dietitian
Facebook: Live Better with Kat Detter

 

 

References:
https://www.intuitiveeating.org/10-principles-of-intuitive-eating/

 

 

 

4 Reasons Why Diet Culture is Harmful

With appearance and health being at the forefront of society, many people choose to go on a diet at some point in their life…some without even realizing it…

Weight Watchers, Keto, Paleo, Atkins, Whole30, South Beach, Cabbage Soup Diet, Boiled Egg + Grapefruit, The Zone, Fat-Free, Sugar-Free, various Detoxes…

“It’s not a diet, it’s lifestyle change…”

anti diet culture

I can whole-heartidly be on board with choosing nourishing foods, finding joyful movement daily, and respecting your body–but when your “health promoting goals” become just as much of an obsession as a fad diet–it can quickly transform into a diet.

I want you to sit back and think for a moment what your incentive was for trying a fad diet…what was your purpose for it?

For me, it was to be skinny. Yep, original–I know. I was “bigger” than the other girls in school, and all I wanted was to be thin just like them. I tried what seemed like everything–skipped meals, went vegetarian, only ate fruits + veggies, fat-free…and you know where all of this got me? No where. I had little to no energy to exercise (which was the only thing that could uplift my mood), I was irritable (hello HANGRY), and wasn’t losing weight! Food became an unhealthy obsession I struggled with for YEARS, all sprung from society’s marketing for fad diets.

So, what’s wrong with fad diets & diet culture?

1. Poor relationship with food

The fad diet mindset can easily turn your thoughts into negativity when it comes to food and nutrition. Many times, especially if your goal is strictly appearance driven, you will do anything to look a certain way…restrict, diet, over-exercise, juice cleanse etc. If a diet tells you to stop eating a certain food or food group, you’ll do it. If the fad diet tells you a food is  bad, you’ll refrain from it. This quickly turns into a poor relationship with food, and when you consume the “bad foods”, you are overwhelmed with a guilt that consumes your thoughts. These thoughts are likely to turn into an obsession.

2. Obsession

Anything can become and obsession–diets included! A lot of times these low-key obsessions  start out innocently…

For example, when I was 10 years old, I went dress shopping. I found the perfect dress, and someone told me, “Katrina, now you can’t gain any weight if you want to buy this dress”…

Now, at the time I didn’t think anything of it…but eventually I started asking people “do I look fatter than I did before I ate, I gotta fit in this dress”, and it became an obsession with not gaining weight…and that is where my restriction and poor relationship with food & body began.

This obsession can be with appearance or with food. You can be constantly thinking about food, what are you gonna eat next, when can you eat it, where is it gonna come from, etc. That obsession has absolutely no benefit to reach your goals…it will get you no where. There is more to life than obsessing about food…

3. Possibly missing out on key nutrients

Most fad diets encourage an elimination of some food group–Keto: carbs, Paleo: dairy + grains/legumes, Whole30: dairy + grains/legumes for 30 days, Atkins: carbs. These fad diets are teaching people that these “food groups” are bad for you, causing you to have a “fear” of these foods…when really they each serve a purpose in human physiology.

This is how the cycle goes: 
Poor relationship with food–> Obsession over food –> Missing key nutrients

Carbohydrates are our bodies main source of energy–our needs are dependent on activity level, but every.single.person needs carbs. Now, of course certain medical conditions (such as epilepsy) may require very little amounts of carbs–but most of the human population bodies thrive off of carbs.

While we can live without dairy, especially since there are many alternatives now, dairy products have a lot of nutritional value–calcium, protein, vitamin D, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, vitamins A, B12–and if you want to have it in your diet, then do so!

Grains and legumes are nutritional powerhouses full of fiber + protein + carbohydrates. Plants are nutritious, even if they are “starchy”. Grains contain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folate) and minerals (iron, magnesium and selenium) which our body needs for metabolism. Legumes are the “King of Fiber” containing nearly 7 grams per 1/2 cup serving and are considered a good plant-based protein source.

While yes, you can supplement essentially any nutrient now, it’s always best to get from food first, then supplement if needed. However, our bodies are designed to metabolize FOOD…not factory made supplements…

4. Quick fixes can hinder your long term wellness goals

What happens when you restrict + count calories + eliminate foods??? You lose weight.

What happens a few months later when you reach your “goal weight” and realize you can’t sustain the diet choices you’ve made over the past few months? You start eating food again…and a couple things may happen…

a) If you’ve been restricting calories and food, your body may store food as fat because your body doesn’t know when it will get food again.

b) You could over-indulge in satisfying foods because you’ve been restricting them for so long–leading to excess weight gain.

The problem with fad diets is that they do not teach you how to sustainably eat for life. Going the rest of your life without your favorite food is unrealistic…which is why making SMART goals to transform your lifestyle is the way to accomplish your health and wellness goals.

***DISCLAIMER:  These diets may have worked for you. However, research shows dieting is not sustainable for life long term, which is why I do not promote them. Do what is best for you and your body, and if you are ready to jump-start your mindful & intuitive eating journey – download my 6 Steps to Mindful Eating guide here – it’s free!

Until Next Time,
Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @mindful.eating.dietitian
FB: Live Better with Kat Detter
Twitter: @katrinadetterRD

6 Things that are Damaging for Your Health

Have you ever chased a smaller body? Felt like your worth was dependent on your weight?

Most people try to lose weight at some point in their life…and unfortunately, diet culture promotes quick fixes that do not last a lifetime. Did you know that within 2-5 years of dieting, 95% of people gain weight lost back, plus more pounds? It’s time we stopped chasing diet culture’s lies and started choosing health promoting behaviors > weight loss for good. Here are the 6 things that are damaging for your health.

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    1. You’re not eating foods that make your body physically feel good

What foods make your body feel good physically? Think about it – foods that contain micronutrients – vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Those are found in nutrient dense foods like whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. If you are constantly fatigued, constipated, low energy, or you “don’t feel good”, re-assess your food choices and see where you can add in some of those nutrient dense foods. Does that mean that other foods are “bad”? Absolutely not.

With mindful & intuitive eating, choosing food that make your body physically feel good is key…but honoring your food cravings are equally important. You’ll find out why later in this blog post!

 3. You’re not drinking enough water

Our bodies are literally made up of mostly water–meaning we thrive off of water. My college anatomy and physiology professor said if you’re actually “thirsty” then you’re already dehydrated…so be sure you’re drinking enough water throughout the day. Enough fluids also aids in digestion to help build that healthy colon and keep you regular, if you know what I mean. Set small goals for yourself – for example: I will drink 4 water bottles by the time I leave work for the day.

   4. You’re restricting foods

A popular diet culture belief–restriction. If you eliminate carbs, you’ll lose weight. If you avoid fat, you’ll lose weight. If you eliminate gluten, you’ll lose weight. If you eat only protein, you’ll lose weight. If you fast, you’ll lose weight. And you know what? Many people do lose weight from restriction–however, when restricted foods are reintroduced into their life, it likely leads to a “binge”, and a food guilt session follows. That is why it is so important to eat balanced meals including all, yes all, foods at each consistent meal. Eating consistently is more sustainable for life, and you get to enjoy all foods.

With a life of mindful & intuitive eating, kales & cookies can coexist!

   5. You’re only doing cardio.

Trust me, I’ve been here! I am a cardio queen-running, dancing, swimming, biking–my favorites! Cardio burns the most calories and makes you sweat-and back when I was in the height of my disordered eating, that is all I cared about. Cardio is important for cardiovascular health…but strength training is just as important. Sculpting exercises builds muscles so we can be strong, complete activities of daily living, improve body mechanics and protect bone health.

  6. Poor relationship with food

Have you ever beaten yourself up over eating a food you consider “bad”? What about feeling good about yourself for eating something deemed “good”? That is the problem. Labeling foods as “good” and “bad”. With mindful & intuitive eating, all foods can fit as long as you’re enjoying balanced nutrition. Labeling foods is not good for mental clarity. Foods do not hold moral value. Part of life is enjoyment, and if that means eating your favorite food, then do it! You will have more food freedom if you get out of the “good food-bad food” mentality.

   7. Self Doubt

Is this something you struggle with? I do too. But hunny, remember – you are beautifully and wonderfully made! This is my favorite positive affirmation to remember. God designed you to be YOU. Unfortunately, we live in a society that glorifies weight loss…and when we aren’t successful with keeping weight off from diet culture, we feel like a failure…but I’m here to tell you that you do not need to give into the lies of wellness culture. You do you, boo!

Jumpstart your mindful eating journey by downloading my 6 steps to mindful eating guide here – it’s free!!

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter
Follow me on social media!

Total Body Interval Training

Anyone stuck in a rut with workouts?
Here are some exercise ideas to incorporate into your workouts—whether they be at home, at the gym, or at a park!
Now that spring is here and the weather is nice, I love to go running but want to get a total body workout in as well…here are a few ideas to get a great total body workout in at your local park or greenway: ***i show modifications to most exercises in video so the workout is friendly for all fitness levels 😊

 

Interval Running/Jogging + Exercises:

•go to your local green-way/park and run/jog/walk (whatever your fitness level may be). Every time you pass a bench, stop and complete one round of 30 seconds work: 10 seconds rest of the exercises shown above. Complete as many rounds as desired, aim between 3-5 rounds. ***modify as needed!
•instead of doing exercises for 30 seconds work:10 second rest, you could choose repetitions instead. For example, when you come to a bench, do 12-15 reps of each exercise, 3-5 rounds.
These are just a couple of examples and the options are endless! The most important thing is that you MOVE your body and do something you love. Get out, enjoy the sunshine and build those vitamin D stores ☀️

What are your favorite types of workouts?

#livebetterwithkatdetter

Wearing @fitbootyapparel leggings that are so comfy for all types of workouts!!

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!

Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Follow me on social media!

@livebetterwithkatdetter on IG, Facebook, Pinterest

Live Better with Kat Detter on youtube

 

Garlicky Spinach Dip

Who loves spinach dip?? 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️

What if I told you I’ve got a healthy spinach dip recipe?? Using tons of fresh spinach and garlic and instead of mayo or sour cream (like traditional spinach dip), I use nonfat Greek yogurt.

Greek yogurt is packed with protein which makes this appetizer more nutrient dense than traditional spinach dip.

For even more creaminess, I use Neufchâtel cheese. Essentially, it’s low fat cream cheese…I choose to use low fat animal products because they are lower in saturated fat. While our body needs fat, saturated fat (found in animal products) may increase total body cholesterol.

See full printable recipe details below, and be sure to tag @livebetterwithkatdetter in your creations!

Healthy Spinach Dip

  • Servings: 8 servings
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 cups fresh spinach, chopped
  • 5 cloves fresh garlic, minced
  • 1 cup nonfat Greek yogurt
  • 1-8 ounce block of Neufchâtel cheese
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • Additional add ins: fresh broccoli and artichokes work well in the recipe too!

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. In a medium sized mixing bowl, add spinach, garlic, Greek yogurt, Neufchâtel cheese, mozzarella, Parmesan, onion powder, garlic salt, and Italian seasoning.
  3. Mix well.
  4. Add to baking dish and top with more cheese.
  5. Bake at 400 degrees for one hour or until bubbly. Let dip “rest” to thicken up.
  6. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips and fresh veggies!
  7. Enjoy!

What’s your favorite type of dip?

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!

Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Connect with me on social media!

FB & Pinterest: Live Better with Kat Detter

IG: @livebetterwithkatdetter

Shamrock Skewers

No, I didn’t take the time to shape my kiwis into actual shamrocks, BUT this is a fun little activity you can do with the fam!

So simple, yet so satisfying and a great snack option to add to your St. Patrick’s day festivities.

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Shamrock Skewers

  • Servings: 10 skewers
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 8 kiwis
  • 2 cups fresh pineapple
  • 1 cup green grapes, washed

Directions: 

  1. Wash kiwis, peel using a small knife. Cut into 1 inch round pieces.
  2. Using a skewer, alternate kiwi, pineapple, and grapes until you reach the top of the skewer.
  3. Serve at your St. Patty’s day party or as a snack at home!

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Such a simple little festive treat!

How are you celebrating St. Patrick’s day this weekend?

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!

Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Follow me on social media!

Facebook, Pinterest, & YouTube: Live Better with Kat Detter

Instagram: @livebetterwithkatdetter

Banana Pops for RD Day!

Happy Registered Dietitian Day to my fellow RD’s!

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This is a fun day in our profession, so I wanted to celebrate by sharing a fun dessert idea with you all–whether you’re an RD or not!

Making banana pops is a great activity to get the kids involved, too!

 

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Banana Pops

  • Servings: 4 servings
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 bananas (I like to use perfectly yellow ones)
  • Toppings: I kept it simple with chopped English walnuts and unsweetened dried cranberries

Directions:

  1. In a medium sized pot, add 1 1/2 cups of water and set on stove on medium heat. Place a heat resistant bowl on top of pot to make the chocolate mixture (or use a double boiler).
  2. Add in chocolate, coconut oil, and vanilla. Stir continuously to prevent burning. **If you want to skip that step (as it takes a while), add all chocolate ingredients in a microwavable safe bowl, microwave at 30 second intervals stirring between each time until melted completely).
  3. Cut bananas in half.
  4. Dip bananas in chocolate.
  5. Top with favorite toppings.
  6. Freeze or refrigerate for 15 minutes or until ready to serve.
  7. Tightly seal in container and keep in freezer for easy on the go snacks or desserts.
  8. Enjoy!

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Other topping ideas:

  • unsweetened coconut flakes
  • golden raisins
  • chia seeds
  • peanuts
  • freeze-dried fruit
  • mini chocolate chips
  • chopped apricots
  • pistachios

 

What are your favorite toppings?

 

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Follow me on social media!

IG: @livebetterwithkatdetter

FB, Pinterest, YouTube: Live Better with Kat Detter

What It Means To Be Healthy

“It’s called the South Beach Fat Flush, and all you drink is cranberry juice for 72 hours.” – Regina George from Mean Girls

This is the world we live in. People going on fad diets, cleanses, detoxes, and fasts to look a certain way. This is what people think it means to be healthy.

As I have mentioned before, being healthy is not a one-size-fits-all approach. What I do on a daily basis may not work for you, and vice versa. However, there are healthy living practices that we can use as a guide to help inspire us to live a better life.

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  • Be active most days of the week

This is kind of vague, but it goes back to my point of every body being different, and we all have different goals. A person beginning their fitness journey may not run as far as the person training for their first half marathon. The body builder working toward a competition likely works out hours a day while the person wanting to tone works out for an hour…all of that is irrelevant. Do what works for you and your goals. The most important thing is that you are active.

  • Eat your veggies

…or all plants for that matter. Plants are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and water, making them BEST for your body. Strive to get the majority of your diet from plants, making half of your plate non-starchy veggies at meals. Not only will it be kind to your waistline, but the fiber will help you feel full for longer periods of time AND will help keep your digestion regular.

  • Stay hydrated

This is so vital. Our bodies are 55-60% water, so it is important that we replace what is lost. Water can be lost in the obvious ways–urine, sweat, and bowel movements…but we also lose water when we breathe and stress! When we are dehydrated, our body’s cortisol (the stress hormone) levels increase–making it another good idea to drink water consistently throughout the day to decrease stress levels.

  • Limit added sugars

Women should truly be consuming 25 grams or less of added sugars daily, while the recommendation for men is 36 grams per day. On average, one 12 ounce can of soda contains 39 grams of added sugar–that is over a days worth! Added sugar can also wreck your immune system, making it easier for you to get sick. While I am not saying you can never splurge and have sugar, be mindful of where your added sugars are coming from and limit them most of the time.

  • Engage in healthy relationships

We were made to communicate with each other–as much of an introvert I am…I realize how important it is to be part of a community. Spend time with your family and friends–go out of your way to be kind to others. Socialize with people you’ve just met. Get to know someone new. You will be more fulfilled, create new relationships, and grow as a person.

  • Grow spiritually

Regardless of your religious preferences, take time for your spiritual life daily. It can be so easy getting caught up in the chaos of every day, but make time for your devotions. As a Christian, I talk to God throughout the day, multiple times a day. Writing in my prayer journal is another way I feel connected with Him, and it is neat to look back on past entries to see what He has done to help me overcome past issues.

 

What other guides do you use to stay healthy?  Remember, healthy living is individualized to your own personal needs. If you’d like help meeting those needs and want to jump on the healthy lifestyle bandwagon, send me a message!

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!

Katrina Detter, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Follow me on social media!

Instagram: @betterwithkatdetter_rd

Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube: Live Better with Kat Detter