Favorite ‘Must Haves’

Here is a list of some of my favorite things from books to snacks to home-workout equipment!

Books

  1. Intuitive Eating: This book is life changing! If you are interested in ditching dieting for good and finding food freedom + body respect, you must add this book to your list. It is foundational in everything I teach.
  2. Anti-Diet: Another profound anti-diet culture book with eye-opening statistics on the history of diets. This book will help you see the problem with weight stigma & diet culture.

Snacks

  1. RX Vanilla Almond Butter: I love everything about these on-the-go almond butter packets. Easy, portable, tasty and a great source of protein & healthy fat to add to oats, fruit or just eat by itself!
  2. Lily’s Chocolate Bar Variety Pack: ($5.50 / bar versus >$7.00 / bar) This is the way to buy Lily’s Chocolate! Sweetened with stevia with all of the delicious chocolate flavor. With food freedom, you can choose the real chocolate AND a lower sugar option – it’s all about what makes your body feel its best.
  3. Simple Mills Crackers: All of the flavors are bomb, but my favorite is the Rosemary Sea Salt.

Home Workout Equipment

  1. Resistance Bands: I love resistance bands because you get a great muscle burn from them without them taking up much space. I don’t have these exact ones, but love all the different levels provided.
  2. Pilates Ball: Upgrade your throw pillow to an actual Pilates ball to add to your workouts.
  3. Free Weights: Add these free hand weights to you workout collection. I don’t have these exact ones, but mine are similar! Love the neoprene covering for gripping.

Kitchen Gadgets

  1. NutriBullet: I LOVE my nutribullet! Great for making quick smoothies on the go, blender muffins, and easy clean up!

Definitely let me know if you try any of these!

Until Next Time,
Happy Chewing!
xoxo
Katrina

This blog post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on a product link, I may receive a commission. All opinions are my own, and all brands featured represent what I personally like and support. This blog is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program where I earn advertising fees by linking to amazon.com.

5 Signs Your “Healthy Lifestyle” is a Diet in Disguise

So, you’ve dieted what seems like most of your life…and you’ve finally said you’re “done” with dieting…you just want to be “healthy”…so you look to magazines, blogs, Pinterest, and social media influencer’s to help you…

“This” influencer tells you to take a bunch of supplements, fast once a week, and drink a herbal detox twice a month. You do what they say, after all – this is what it takes to be “healthy”, right?

Then, “that” influencer tell you it’s okay to eat “forbidden” foods, but only on cheat days. And, if you want to eat fruit, don’t eat more than 2 servings per day if you really want to be “healthy”.

…only eat organic, non GMO foods if you want to be “healthy”.

Oh, and don’t even think about touching any grains, legumes, beans or night-shade plants because, well…you want to be “healthy”, don’t you?

“It’s not a diet, it’s a healthy lifestyle”…

Do you see a pattern here? It doesn’t matter if it’s a “fad” diet or not…if someone tells you to completely eliminate one food item out of your “lifestyle” (unless it’s an allergy or legit medical condition) – it’s a diet!

Now, why are diets undesirable? What’s wrong with them?

Well, in short, 90-95% of diets don’t work in the long haul. They aren’t sustainable for life. People go on diets to lose weight, then within 2-5 years after that diet, all the weight that was lost is gained back, plus some extra pounds. Does this sound familiar to you? It definitely resonates with me. And I’m sorry…but if you are still demonizing food but you’re not on an official “fad diet”, you’ve got a poor relationship with food. And without a true healthy relationship with food, you’ll have a hard time getting out of that “diet” mentality – whether you’re on a formal diet or not!

Here are 5 ways you can test if your “healthy lifestyle” is in fact diet culture posing as “wellness” or “fitness” culture.

  1. You have a “good food – bad food” mentality
    You only buy the almond flour crackers because wheat is “bad”. You only buy cauliflower crust because it’s “gluten free”. You’ll only allow yourself to eat blueberries because other fruits are “fattening”, and blueberries are “super-foods”. You eat sweet potatoes over white potatoes because they are “healthier” according to diet culture. You’ll never touch anything with refined sugar in it, but eat the tar out of something made out of maple syrup or coconut sugar.

    My friends, that is diet culture in disguise. “Wellness culture” is just modern day diet culture. If you find yourself forbidding these foods but you’re not on a “formal fad diet” – you’re still being affected by diet culture. Start by normalizing all foods. All foods provide your body with some sort of value, whether it’s nutrient dense or not.

    Now, of course nutrient dense foods are nourishing for the body because they make our bodies physically feel good – packed full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber – but that doesn’t mean it’s “better” than other foods. Food does not hold a moral value – one food is not going to lead to weight gain or weight loss…food in excess leads to weight gain – regardless of what food it is.
  2. You have to “earn” food
    Wellness culture highlights the importance of intense exercise. And if you want to be healthy, you gotta exhaust yourself in your workout (according to fitness culture).

    I’m totally on board with exercise – I love it! I love it because it makes my body feel amazing – inside and out. But, why are you exercising? Are you exercising to burn calories? Do you find yourself overly exhausted after a workout? Can’t sit on a toilet 2 days after a leg workout? You’re likely over-training.

    I used to think I had to burn at least 500 calories in a workout if I wanted to eat for the day. And if I was “planning” on eating dessert or going out to eat, I’d push myself even harder so I could “earn” food. But you know what? Your body STILL deserves and physically needs nourishment even if you lay in the bed all day. You of course need more fuel the more active you are…but you need food every single day – regardless if you worked out or not. You don’t have to exercise to earn food. Your body needs it for survival. Period.
  3. If you’re craving “this”, eat “that”
    Have you ever seen those Pinterest graphics that say “if you’re craving chocolate, that means you’re deficient in magnesium. Eat some kale, it’ll curb your craving!”

    I used to follow that stuff! And y’all – I don’t care who you are – if you’re craving chocolate, I can promise you eating kale will not satisfy that craving. I see this a lot from people’s experiences (and my own) – trying so hard to mask the craving by eating something “healthy” instead…

    What happens is, when we don’t honor that craving and try to substitute with something else, our mind can’t stop thinking about that one food. You end up eating other things to “fix” the craving…but ultimately, those other foods don’t satisfy you. So, you end up “giving in” and eating the craving anyway…you likely feel over-stuffed and intense food guilt. You blame the craving, when really it was all the food leading up to the craving that over-stuffed you.

    Has this ever happened to you? I’ve been there!

    Tip: Always honor your craving in an amount that will satisfy your body to prevent a binge later on.
  4. You have to “track” your food
    This is probably my favorite one. Not too long ago, I did a “fitness challenge” hoping to work on my muscular strength. A big part of the program was tracking your food using MyFitnessPal. I did it for a few days just to see if I was hitting my macros…

    Even though I thought I was “recovered” from diet culture at that point in my life (I wasn’t by the way…I was stuck in “wellness” culture), I found myself feeling guilty about food. I was so obsessed with getting my macros and calorie counts perfect, and when I didn’t count calories, I was worried if I was eating too much…”if I eat this, will I go over my allotted calories for the day?”…”am I allowed to have this?”…”is there too much fat in this avocado?”…”crap, I’ve gone over my carb count for the day, guess I can’t have anything other than water for supper…”

    My “so-called” recovered diet-self was on a downward spiral back into diet culture, so I stopped tracking my food & quit taking “before & after” pics, and focused on how the workouts made my body physically feel. How the workouts improved my strength and flexibility. How the workouts improved my stress levels and mental well-being.

    You CAN love fitness & exercise without tracking your macros. You CAN be “healthy” without tracking every little thing that you put into your mouth. Calorie & macro counting is meticulous and time exhausting – you can do SO much more with your time!
  5. “Cheat days” or “cheat meals”
    This is very popular in the fitness industry. More specifically, cheat meals. You can eat anything you want in an hour time frame. So, you’ve restricted all these “cheat” foods for at least a week, as soon as you gain access to those foods during your “cheat hour”, you’re going to cram that food into your mouth as fast as you can so you don’t waste any of it…so you can eat as much of this “yummy, terrible for you” foods before the hour is up.

    This is wrong on so many levels. First, you have the “good-foods bad-foods” mentality. Second, you’re completely ignoring your hunger & fullness cues – a very instrumental step in mindful & intuitive eating. Our body was designed to tell us when we are hungry & when we are full – to prevent us from overeating. But, when we restrict “forbidden” foods from our “lifestyles”, as soon as we get access to them when it’s “okay”, we go all out! And then, as a result, feel like total crap after the meal- then we blame that food! It wasn’t the food’s fault, it was the food in excess…the decision you made to ignore your hunger & fullness levels because it’s a “cheat meal”. Third, you tell yourself “I’ll just go back on my diet tomorrow”, and it creates a diet-binge-diet-binge-diet-binge cycle. If you’ve been a chronic dieter, I know you’ve been there- I’ve been there too!

Did any of this resonate with you? Let me know in the comments section here or on Instagram. I know it’s hard to let go of the diet mentality – in both diet culture & the fitness/wellness industry. Know that your body is worthy of achieving health promoting goals that have nothing to do with dieting, weight loss, restriction, deprivation, or over-exercising. You CAN be healthy without falling into diet culture’s trap.

Jumpstart your mindful eating journey by downloading my 6 Steps to Mindful Eating guide here – it’s free!



Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Follow me on social media for more food freedom + gentle nutrition + body respect material

5 Tips to Gain Body Confidence

What’s your experience with poor body image?

My poor body image started when I was a pre-teen–about 10 years old. I wasn’t tiny like the other girls my age…I didn’t have many friends, I was insecure, I lacked confidence and self worth. That mindset followed me throughout middle and most of high school until I decided I was worth more. I deserved more. Now, it still took me years to be at peace with my body (and I still struggle with it today!), BUT these 5 tips have helped me keep those negative thoughts away…and it can help you, too!

Body Confidence

1. Wear clothes that make you feel good
Dress to impress–yourself! Ain’t nobody got time to wear clothes that don’t make them FEEL good. If that means going a size up, do it! The size of your clothes does not define you as a person or your health.

When I was in high school and college, I’d only wear things that were a certain size. If they didn’t fit me, I would put them back on the rack and forget they existed. No sizing up for me!

Last week I went shopping and found THE cutest rompers–and guess what? The small was too small for me! Instead of dreaming about how cute it “would have” been, I decided to try the medium-and I’m so glad I did because it looks good, and I feel super confident in it. Don’t let the size of something define you. Wear clothes that embrace your confidence!

2. Move your body
Why do you move your body? Exercise releases endorphins, the happy hormone, and those endorphins can help you have a clear, happy mind. What’s more? They can bring you confidence.

Think of the different kinds of workouts you’ve done. Which ones make your body feel amazing?? Which ones make you feel defeated? Choose to do the activity that makes you feel good.

As for me, swimming makes my body feel amazing from my head to my toes. I can feel all my muscles. Our bodies are all different and we all like different things, so find what jives with you.

3. Celebrate your body
“My legs are too short.”
“My butt is too big.”
“My thighs are huge.”
“My stomach isn’t flat.”

I was concerned with every one of those things when I was a pre-teen–overly consumed with ‘how’ my body looked…constantly comparing myself to my teenie-bopper classmates. But you know what I was doing wrong? I was shaming my body for what it wasn’t instead of celebrating it for what it was! When you can change the mindset of “these are my imperfections” to “these are my strengths”, you can love and appreciate your body more.

My legs may be short, but I have them-and they get me from point A to point B. I am able to challenge myself in my workouts daily. My booty and thighs may be “bigger”, but they are strong. Any time a negative thought comes into your mind, just think of how far you’ve come and tell yourself, “Nope, we aren’t gonna talk like that. We are gonna celebrate our body instead”.

4. Stop comparing yourself to others
It’s super common to envy what others have–we all have our insecurities…me included! If you find yourself comparing yourself to someone on social media, unfollow them. If you compare yourself to someone else in the gym, go workout in a different spot. Bottom line: try your best to eliminate the source of negativity. Stop comparing yourself to others and start celebrating YOU. You do you, boo!

5. Daily Affirmations
Affirmations can help you change your mindset about your body and self worth. I encourage you to engage in daily affirmations. Look at yourself in the mirror and say:

“My body deserves love and respect”
“Food is not the enemy, I’m grateful food nourishes me”
“Thank you, body, for getting me through that tough workout”
“My worth is not defined by my weight”
“I am comfortable in my own skin”
“Other people’s opinion on my body do not involve my thoughts”
“I take care of my body by doing ______”
“My body is a vessel for my awesomeness”
“I feel sexy today!”

It doesn’t matter what you tell yourself–whether you tell it to yourself in the mirror or write in down in a journal–positive self talk is foundational in changing your mindset toward your body and self.

I challenge you to focus on one of these tips this week. Track your progress, make goals for yourself. You deserve to be unconditionally happy with food, your body, and yourself.

Jumpstart your mindful eating journey by downloading my 6 Steps to Mindful Eating guide here – it’s free!

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @mindful.eating.dietitian
FB: Live Better with Kat Detter
Twitter: @katrinadetterRD

4 Steps to Learn Your Hunger Cues

One of the 10 Principles of Intuitive eating is using your hunger and fullness cues, but what does that actually mean? How do you do that?

After years of fad dieting, I kind of lost touch with my physiological signs of hunger. I ate when society said it was “time to eat”. If I was hungry at 11:00am, I’d avoid it like the plague until the clock striked 12:00pm. I used to treat hunger as a “bad thing”–because I associated eating as a “bad thing”. Now that I have a healthier relationship with food and myself, I am able to eat when I am hungry and stop when I am satisfied, and you can too! Use my 4 Steps to Learn Your Hunger & Fullness Cues!

Hunger & Fullness Cues
Learn you Hunger & Fullness Cues

Use a hunger/fullness scale before, during & after meals
When you are first learning your hunger/fullness levels, it is important to use some sort of scale to keep your hunger in check. On a scale from 1-10, how hungry are you? how full are you? are you satisfied? Ask yourself these questions before, during and after a meal or snack to help you gauge your true hunger. The goal is to be completely satisfied with your meal–not hungry or overly full. This is not only to keep you physiologically full  until the next meal, but also to help you keep your mind off of food.

Hunger & Fullness Scale
Hunger & Fullness Scale

Journal before and after your meals
As cheesy as it sounds, this can be your most helpful tool in re-learning your hunger & fullness cues. When you use the hunger & fullness scale, write about it! Before your meal, document what level of hunger you’re experiencing. After your meal, note what level of  fullness you’re experiencing. If you are not satisfied, figure out what you can add to your meal to appease your hunger. If you are miserably full, write down how you can prevent that from happening in the future.

Hunger & Fullness Cues
Journal before & after meals while learning hunger & fullness cues

Avoid starvation: use practical hunger
Practical hunger is essentially eating something when you’re not physically hungry to prevent overidulgence later. For example, if you are not very hungry at 12:30pm but you know you won’t get to eat again until 6:00pm, use practical hunger to tide you over. When using practical hunger, choose foods that will nourish your body with at least 2 of the 3 macronutrients. This will keep you full for a longer period of time.

Slow down at meals
Take time to really enjoy your food. It will not only make your meal more enjoyable but also allow your hunger to catch up with your brain. When you take your time at meals, it allows you to feel hunger satisfaction before you reach the “over full” stage, preventing overindulgence.

A note on overeating:
It happens. Try not to beat yourself up about it. Our bodies can handle some overeating here and there–we learn from it and move on. It takes time in the beginning when you’re learning how to correctly use your hunger/fullness cues. Give yourself grace and learn from your experience. Eventually, you will know your body so well that overeating will happen less.

 

I challenge you to learn your hunger & fullness cues. Take it one step at a time, and you’ll eventually become fully in tune with your body’s hunger.

 

Remember! If you’d like to receive my email newsletters for more easy + balanced eating ideas & food freedom tips, subscribe here! Tell your friends 🙂

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @balanced.nutrition.dietitian
FB: Live Better with Kat Detter
Twitter: @katrinadetterRD

 

5 Ways to Build Easy & Filling Meals

Hey, friend!

Do you ever feel hungry shortly after a meal? Or just not really satisfied at all quickly after eating?

There could be a reason for that! On one hand, you may not be eating enough. On the other, you may not be balancing out your meals.

I don’t know about you, but when I’m hungry I can’t focus on anything else but that hunger.

Have no fear! Today I am going to share with you 5 ways you can build filling meals so you are happily fueled the rest of the day to prevent brain fog and the hangry monster.

easy & filling meals
How to make easy meals filling and satisfying

  1. Bulk up the fiber
    And I’m not talking fiber supplements! I mean load up on the PLANTS! Vegetables, fruits, 100% whole grains–add them to your meals! Fiber is a nondigestible carb that helps keep us full for a long period of time. Plus, it can help with prevention and management of chronic diseases, aiding in digestion and weight management.

    Easy ways to add fiber to your meals:

    easy & filling meals
    easy ways to add fiber to your meals to keep you full
  2. Incorporate a heart healthy fat
    Fat plays an instrumental role for our body (especially us gals) because it is important for hormone production. Back in the 1990s, fat was deemed “bad” by society and diet culture. While fat does have more calories per gram than carbs or protein, it is still a vital nutrient our bodies need. Lots of people avoid fat-and that could be why you’re hungry soon after a meal! Incorporating heart healthy fats into your meals can be a great way to keep your body satisfied until your next meal.

    Ways to add fats to meals:

    Add avocado to you salads/sandwiches
    Mix nuts into yogurt parfaits
    Drizzle salad with Olive Oil based dressings
    Sprinkle chia seeds on your smoothie bowls
    Incorporate fish (like salmon, tuna, mahi mahi) to your meals twice a week

    easy & filling meal
    Mahi Mahi fish tacos with avocado-perfect easy & filling, balanced meal
  3. Ensure there is enough protein
    To be honest, the protein element in meals is the hardest one for me to plan! I’m not a big meat eater, so I get a lot of my protein from vegetarian sources (like beans, legumes, corn, grains, soy, etc) or dairy…but I can defintely tell a difference in my hunger levels when I am not getting enough protein at meals. Pro tip: plan and prep ahead of time!

    Some of my fave + EASY ideas:
    Boil eggs for the week
    Make dried beans in the crockpot (easy + low maintenance)
    Canned fish – salmon & tuna (easy for on the go protein)
    Frozen pre cooked grilled chicken (easy for busy nights)
    Boil chicken for the week (quick + easily accessible for quick lunches/dinners)
    Greek yogurt (great for breakfast or snacks)
    Make your own veggie burger (then freeze for easy protein source)
    Add nut butters/nuts to meals/snacks

    easy + filling meals
    Filling snacks with non starchy vegetables (fiber), hummus (protein + complex carb) to keep you fueled and full for hours

     

  4. Include a complex carbohydate 
    Okay, okay…I know the whole craze is to go carb free, but honey…our bodies run off of carbs. We need carbs for energy. Choosing to go “no carb” or even strictly “low carb” is not a sustainable lifestyle choice…so, eat the carbs! Complex carbs (like 100% whole grains, potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn, fruits etc) contain fiber in them making them more satisfying than refined, simple carbs (such as sugar, refined white flour/grains, baked goods, soda, etc). The more active you are, the more carbs your body is going to want–so be mindful while you are planning your meals.

    Some ideas on how to add carbs to your diet:
    Add fresh/frozen berries to oatmeal
    Snack on a banana with peanut butter
    Eat raw veggies (carrots, celery, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, etc) with hummus for snack
    Mix in brown rice with your cauliflower rice
    Try bean pasta (chickpea, lentil, edamame)

    Easy + Filling Mexican Quinoa Bake
    Filling meal with protein/ complex carb (black beans + quinoa), non starchy vegetables (salad + fiber), and healthy fat (cheese)!

     

  5. Choose satisfying foods
    How many of you are guilty of eating salads for lunch but actually hate them?? I’ve been there! I used to force drink kale smoothies in college–plot twist: I HATE raw kale. I hate kale in smoothies. BUT I was trying to be “healthy”. And you know where it got me?? 20 minutes later, in my dorm room, eating all the snacks because I was not satisfied with my food choice. Smoothies are great, but when they contain things you don’t like and there is an imbalance of nutrients, then you’re gonna be munchin’ on whatever you can find shortly after. What are foods that satisfy you? Let me know in the comments section 🙂

Easy & Filling Meals
Choose foods that satisfy YOU! Food that brings you joy and nourishes your body

I hope these tips were helpful for you! Comment down below (or on social media) how YOU stay full and fueled at your meals. I challenge you to keep these things in mind while you’re meal planning and prepping so you can build balanced meals that keep you FULL and satisfied.

Easy & Filling meals
Build easy & FILLING meals

Remember! If you’d like to receive my email newsletters for more easy + balanced eating ideas & food freedom tips, subscribe here! Tell your friends 🙂

 

Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
xoxo
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
Follow me on social media!
IG: @balanced.nutrition.dietitian
FB: Live Better with Kat Detter
Twitter: @katrinadetterRD

 

What is Intuitive Eating?

Have you ever struggled with food freedom? Felt guilty at just the thought of eating a certain food or food group? Been on every diet in the book?

I sure have. I have shared my obsessions with food and over-exercising several times before…and today, I want to share with you the freedom I have found with intuitive eating.

Intuitive eating is such a big topic that I am going cover a few blog posts on. Today, I am going to break down what intuitive eating is and what it is not. It is my hope that if you struggle with food rules, deprivation, restriction, purging, or maintaining a healthy relationship with food that this may become one of your wellness goals: to become an intuitive eater.

Green Field Girl Spring Pinterest Graphic

What is Intuitive Eating?
When you think “intuitive” think “instinctive”. What are our actual physical instincts when it comes to hunger? Logically, when we are hungry, we *should* eat. Many restrictive diets cause us to completely neglect our true hunger cues and just eat a portioned amount of food based on society’s limitations.

Intuitive eating is also based on these 10 principles:
1. Rejecting the diet mentality
2. Honoring your hunger
3. Making peace with food
4. Challenging the food police
5. Discovering the satisfaction factor
6. Feel your fullness
7. Cope with your body’s emotions with kindness
8. Respecting your body
9. Exercising to feel a difference
10. Honoring your health

The Break-Down of The 10 Principles of Intuitive Eating:

  1. Rejecting the diet mentality:
    Transitioning the common societal view eating “healthy”. Especially this time of the year, many people go around saying “I am going to get back on track” or “my diet starts tomorrow”. When you become and intuitive eater, you honor your hunger and body by fueling it properly using gentle nutrition, but also know there is a time and a place for cookies…because let’s be real, a life without FUN foods is not as enjoyable.
  2. Honoring your hunger:
    Have you ever been on a “diet” that gave specific times to eat food? Certain portion sizes? Only allowed you to eat certain foods? That’s a major problem with diet culture–not teaching you to really listen, know or honor your hunger cues. With intuitive eating, you base eating needs on your physiological hunger.What are the physiological signs of hunger??
    Physiological hunger is your body’s way of saying “hey, feed me!”

    Signs of hunger:
    *empty stomach
    *stomach growling
    *dizzy/light-headedness
    *headache
    *irritability (HELLO hangry monster!)
    *difficulty concentrating
  3. Making peace with food:
    Any of you ever experienced fear foods? Foods you fear are going to make you gain weight? Foods that society has deemed “bad”?I used to have a huge fear of peanut butter and would only eat the powedered peanut butter because it was low in fat and calories. However, when I started studying nutrition in college, I learned that while peanut butter may be higher in fat and calories, it is also a great plant based protein source. The fat in peanut butter is actually beneficial for your hormone production and heart health. There is much nutrition in peanut butter, and I am happy to say now I am at peace with it and probably eat it daily.You can make peace with any food. When you can break it down and realize your body needs fuel for survival. Truly think of food as fuel. Know that your body can handle eating a cookie on Christmas…a slice of cake on your birthday…a piece of chocolate on Valentine’s day. The bottom line is: with intuitive eating, you never feel deprived or restricted of any food…so when you allow yourself to have more indulgent foods, you don’t feel the need to eat as much as your body can hold.
  4. Challenging the food police:
    Do you know how many times people have analyzed what I eat? Especially now that I am a registered dietitian. I remember my grandpa telling me I shouldn’t eat macaroni and cheese because it would “make me fat”. Or having family members say “Oh, you’re eating cake??” at Thanksgiving dinner. Those comments are annoying, and very difficult for those transiting into the food freedom lifestyle. As hard as it may be, my biggest advice is taking those comments with a grain of salt, and always think about what you’re gonna say next. You can always say “I’m at peace with  food, and very thankful that I can enjoy this pumpkin cheesecake today”. 🙂
  5. Discovering the satisfaction factor:
    Lots of times when we “diet”, we may not be satisfied with what we are being “forced” to eat. “Oh, I’m trying to eat healthy…guess that means I have to eat salad every day.”

    When we are in that mindset of “I have to eat this because it is healthy”, then our bodies aren’t satisfied. We aren’t eating foods we actually enjoy…meaning we aren’t satisfied after a meal. With intuitive eating, you choose foods based on your preference and what you want to eat. You may choose a big mixed greens salad for lunch with some lean protein, avocado, and vinegar based dressing. Other times, you may choose to have a burger with roasted vegetables. Regardless, you learn how to be satisfied after a meal so in turn, you won’t binge and mindlessly eat later on.
  6. Feel your fullness:
    Just as we should honor our hunger cues, we also need to honor our fullness cues, or our satiety level. As an intuitive eater, you learn how to stop eating when you are  full. No one is perfect! Overeating happens to all of us, but intuitive eating can help us learn when to stop at our fullness level, which helps us not overindulge.
  7. Cope with your emotions with kindness:
    This essentially means not to “fix” your emotions with food. Find other kind ways to handle your emotions. Find something that destresses you…that brings you comfort. It could be painting a mural, talking to a friend, journaling…whatever it may be, focus on that instead of food.
  8. Respecting your body:
    This can be easier said than done. From a spiritual aspect, God created you the way He wanted you to be. He wants you to be healthy and develop healthy relationships with people and health. Your body is a celebration of His creation, and wasting time worrying about your size does not enhance your life. Respect your body and what it can do. You are more than the number on the scale or the size in your pants. Focus on your strength. Your talents. Your growth. Your relationships. Your happiness. Respect yourself.
  9. Movement-feel the difference:
    This is all about shifting the mindset of “how many calories can I burn during this session” to “what movement brings me joy?” Don’t run if you hate running. Don’t spin if you hate biking. Find what exercise brings you joy and you’ll never feel “forced” to workout ever again…you’ll even look forward to your workout sessions!
  10. Honor your health using gentle nutrition:
    This is my favorite one! There are so many misconceptions with intuitive eating, but intuitive eaters know how to eat well by using gentle nutrition. With gentle nutrition, you honor your food choices and taste buds with foods you enjoy. Bye, bye kale salads, hello burrito bowls! You don’t instantly become “unhealthy” from one snack, meal, or one day of eating. Intuitive eaters focus on eating well consistently over time versus eating perfectly 24/7. It’s all about progress over perfection with gentle nutrition.

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What Intuitive Eating Isn’t:
Intuitive eating isn’t anti-health. It isn’t eating cookies all day long. It isn’t failing to eat nourishing foods. It isn’t mindlessly eating. It isn’t neglecting physical activity. It isn’t eating highly processed foods “just ‘cuz.”

Intuitive Eating is used to help people truly learn to fuel their bodies without a fear of food, without restricting, without guilt, without over-exercising. Intuitive Eating helps us learn to be comfortable choosing a big salad for lunch, but also realizing if you eat a cookie for dessert that you aren’t “unhealthy”. 

Intuitive Eating
What intuitive eating is and what it isn’t

I hope you now have a better idea of what this intuitive eating movement is all about, and it is my hope that we all can make peace with food. Life is too short to be a chronic dieter.

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Until Next Time,

Happy Chewing!
Katrina Detter, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian
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IG: @mindful.eating.dietitian
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References:
https://www.intuitiveeating.org/10-principles-of-intuitive-eating/